What’s in the Bible (for me)?: 50 readings and reflections

What’s in the Bible (for me)?: 50 readings and reflections

Author : Lucy Moore
£4.99

Opening up Bible reading for Messy Church families

Where do you start with reading the Bible? Here's the perfect gift for Messy Church families and others new to Bible reading – a booklet of 50 bite-sized Bible passages, selected to cover the wide span of the Bible story across Old and New Testaments, with a reflection on each passage by Messy Church founder Lucy Moore. Written in a user-friendly and jargon-free style, What’s in the Bible (for me)? is designed to encourage individuals and families alike to start reading the Bible and find out what it has to say to them.

Title What’s in the Bible (for me)?: 50 readings and reflections
Author Lucy Moore
Description

Where do you start with reading the Bible? Here's the perfect gift for Messy Church families and others new to Bible reading – a booklet of 50 bite-sized Bible passages, selected to cover the wide span of the Bible story across Old and New Testaments, with a reflection on each passage by Messy Church founder Lucy Moore. Written in a user-friendly and jargon-free style, What’s in the Bible (for me)? is designed to encourage individuals and families alike to start reading the Bible and find out what it has to say to them.

What’s in the Bible (for me)? explores the big journey of the Bible. And maybe, as we see the bigger picture, it will help us understand our own journey.

 

Details
  • Product code: 9780857467607
  • Published: 21 February 2020
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 112
  • Dimensions: 112mm wide and 167mm high

Where do you start with reading the Bible? Here's the perfect gift for Messy Church families and others new to Bible reading – a booklet of 50 bite-sized Bible passages, selected to cover the wide span of the Bible story across Old and New Testaments, with a reflection on each passage by Messy Church founder Lucy Moore. Written in a user-friendly and jargon-free style, What’s in the Bible (for me)? is designed to encourage individuals and families alike to start reading the Bible and find out what it has to say to them.

What’s in the Bible (for me)? explores the big journey of the Bible. And maybe, as we see the bigger picture, it will help us understand our own journey.

 

Lucy Moore is the founder of Messy Church. She promotes Messy Church nationally and internationally through training and speaking events, and is the author of a number of books for BRF.

 

 

Church Times 04.12.20. Review by Catherine Pickford

(See also: Holy Habits in Messy Church: Discipleship sessions for churchesHoly Habits Bible Reflections: Serving: 40 readings and reflections and Holy Habits Group Studies Serving: Leader’s guide

All four of these books seek, in different ways, to help their readers to weave “holy habits”, such as generosity, servanthood, worship, and discipleship, deeper into their daily lives.

What’s in the Bible (For Me)? explores the theme of journey in 50 short sections. Each has a Bible reading, a reflection, a question, and a challenge or thought. The deceptively simple format covers a great deal of ground, from the reader’s personal faith journey with God to the social-justice themes of homelessness, the plight of asylum seekers, and the Church’s mission to the poorest in our society. In this little book, Moore connects Bible passages with issues in our modern world and asks what it means to be on a journey with Jesus and how this changes the way Christians live.

Holy Habits in Messy Church is my favourite type of Messy Church book, one with plenty of practical sessions. As part of the introduction, one co-author, Andrew Roberts, offers the analogy of Lego: the maker ‘might follow the booklet once, but then they throw it away and create all sorts of wonderful things.' One of the great strengths of Messy Church is its creators’ commitment to giving it away, and letting churches make it their own. Holy Habits in Messy Church encourages exactly that. There are 11 sessions around holy habit themes, including gladness and generosity, serving, and worship, with a short Bible reading and a story, and then a selection of craft ideas to mix and match.

The last quarter of the book is dedicated to ‘messy vintage’, which is Messy Church for older people. Each of the 11 sessions contains a Bible reading, a single activity, some questions for discussion, a prayer, and a song suggestion. They resemble a hybrid between a Bible study and a prayer station and could be easily adapted for mixed groups of adults and children, or incorporated into a larger act of worship.

Service is prominent in the national consciousness at present, as we celebrate and thank God for key workers, whose acts of service are necessary to our survival. These last two titles reflect on the nature of service as a holy habit, and how a willingness to serve may become embedded in the Christian’s daily life.

Holy Habits Bible Reflections: Serving is one of a series of ten books designed to be used daily over an eight-week period by an individual or group. It offers a two-page spread per day, with a Bible reading, reflection, and prayer. The format is simple and effective, and the four authors complement one another with clear voices and different styles.

Holy Habits Group Studies: Serving is Bible-study material designed to support churches in offering service through mission, discipleship, and social action. The four authors move deftly from the theoretical to the practical, and encourage the group to wrestle with the question of how faith affects the way we live.

As a parish priest, I would want to think carefully about how to use this book. The group is likely to come up with action points that are suggestions for the whole church. They will need a way of presenting their ideas to the church, perhaps through a slot in the PCC meeting. Another idea would be to use part of this study material at the PCC meeting itself to generate an action plan for the whole church.

Taken together, these four books challenge their readers, in different ways, to mould their lives to be more like that of Jesus by adopting holy habits so as to be of service to others as individuals and as a church.

Reviewed by the Ven. Catherine Pickford, Archdeacon of Northolt, London.

 

Progressive Voices, June 2020 (PV33). Review by Stuart Hannabuss

At a time when we wonder whether the church is relevant and why people don’t read the Bible, Messy Church has found imaginative ways of presenting and interpreting scripture. Today’s consumerist message of ‘what’s in it for me?’, is adapted in her attractive and useful little book. Lucy presents fifty themes based on the Bible (one third Old Testament, two thirds New Testament) such as leaving home, making mistakes, feeling lost and being found.

This thematic approach, using a short Biblical passage followed by a reflection, makes the book immediate, practical, and useful for everyday encounters, as well as for discussion groups and, in the right context, schools. Little is lost and much is gained by using themes in this way. Nor is it trite to say that there is ‘strength in travelling together’ and in having ‘the stubbornness to keep you moving’, and ‘the compass, map and star to read’ (the final reflection in the book). 

Such thoughts acknowledge the transforming impact of the Holy Spirit in everyday life. And it’s not Machiavellian of the Church to suggest that we all relate to metaphors, so why not recognise an effective communication channel where it exists. ‘The journey of a human being like you or me towards a destination that becomes clearer with each step’: that’s what’s in it for you and me and the rest of us.

Reviewed by Stuart Hannabuss

 

Reform, May 2020. Review by Catherine Ball

This is a delightful little book written by the founder of Messy Church. It is an eminently readable book, giving a sweeping survey of the entire Bible. Following the theme of journeys, Moore takes us from the story of Adam and Eve, the journey of a family leaving home, through the journey of the ancient nation of Israel, the journey of God coming from heaven to earth and back in Jesus the Messiah, the journey of a new way of life, the early Church and the journey of human beings in faith towards God. It includes women of the Bible and questions to invite further consideration. The language is accessible, concise and clear. Its brevity does not mean that it is simplistic or trite: it offers deeply thought out theology in understandable language. It would be ideal to give to those interested in Christianity, newish Christians or those who want to build upon their Bible knowledge as an aid to growth in discipleship. It has warmth and a human element to which anyone could relate. The broad framework gives an excellent foundation for a balanced and full understanding of Christian faith and life. In these days of short video clips, pictures and soundbites, this is a book that many people would easily read – and finish! It also gives great encouragement in times of difficulty and uncertainty, apt for our lives under the current Covid-19 restrictions. The book is positive, life enhancing and an easy read to curl up with while being stuck in the house.

Reviewed by Catherine Ball is Minister of The Free Church, St Ives, and Fenstanton United Reformed Church, Cambridgeshire