The BRF Book of 365 Bible Reflections: with contributions from BRF authors, supporters and well-wishers

The BRF Book of 365 Bible Reflections: with contributions from BRF authors, supporters and well-wishers

£14.99
The Bible is at the heart of BRF’s work, and this special anniversary collection is a celebration of the Bible for BRF’s centenary year.

Bringing together a fantastically wide-ranging writing team of authors, supporters and well-wishers from all areas of BRF’s work, this resource is designed to help us go deeper into the story of the Bible and reflect on how we can share it in our everyday lives.

Including sections which lead us through the Bible narrative as well as thematic and seasonal sections, it is the perfect daily companion to resource your spiritual journey.

 

Title The BRF Book of 365 Bible Reflections: with contributions from BRF authors, supporters and well-wishers
Author Karen Laister and Olivia Warburton
Description The Bible is at the heart of BRF’s work, and this special anniversary collection is a celebration of the Bible for BRF’s centenary year.

Bringing together a fantastically wide-ranging writing team of authors, supporters and well-wishers from all areas of BRF’s work, this resource is designed to help us go deeper into the story of the Bible and reflect on how we can share it in our everyday lives.

Including sections which lead us through the Bible narrative as well as thematic and seasonal sections, it is the perfect daily companion to resource your spiritual journey.

 

Contributors include: Ian Adams, John Bell, Inderjit Bhogal, Amy Boucher Pye, Stephen Cottrell, Steven Croft, Mark Greene, Isabelle Hamley, Bob Hartman, Bev Jullien, Krish Kandiah, Paul Kerensa, Ann Lewin, Bex Lewis, Chine McDonald, Lucy Moore, Rob Parsons, John Pritchard, Jennifer Rees Larcombe, Pam Rhodes, Margaret Silf, Jo Swinney, Stephen Timms, Graham Tomlin and Justin Welby.

 

Reviews

Transforming Ministry (digital version May 2022). Reviewed by David Sellick

The year 2022 celebrates the  centenary of BRF’s  famous notes encouraging Bible reading and supporting faith.   The 365 reflections are grouped into  five sections; Seeing God in the Bible, Journeying through the Bible,  Journeying through the Christian year, Together through the generations, and How should we live?  Only the ‘Christian Year’ section is chronologically tied; the other sections can be dipped into individually;  this is facilitated by a page ‘Index of Bible references’ at the end of the book;  Readers could use this to take them to a page where the Bible passage  that  had stimulated the writer’s ‘reflection’ is printed matches the passage that is part of a reading set for the day on which the  Reader is due to preach. 

The editors selected single ‘reflections’ from the invited writers – many of great eminence –  so ‘the result is a glorious  range of different perspectives on God’s word’. The Bible extracts are from every book in the Bible, and come from 17 different Bible translations.  Some reflections are personal, some are moving, many are challenging and thought provoking; the compilation can be used as a resource or simply read as an illustration of how just a couple of Bible verses can stimulate such a wide range profound insights into faith and practice.
Reviewed by David Sellick 


Reviewed by Canon John Twisleton, December 2021

A hundred years ago in January 2022 Revd Leslie Mannering of St Matthew’s Brixton circulated his first monthly leaflet of bible readings with commentaries ‘for the purpose of deepening the life of Prayer, Bible-reading and Holy Communion in each one of us’. So began what became the world-wide movement we know as BRF, the Bible Reading Fellowship.

The Centenary is being launched with publication of 365 bible reflections written by different contributors, including myself, geared to energise searching of scripture and submission of lives to the Word of God. As Sally Welch writes, ‘we are not a people of a book… we are children of God… we follow a person, not a page; the Word, not words’.

The genius of BRF is its steering away from both biblical literalism and renegotiation of scripture to fit in with contemporary thinking. The BRF book of 365 Bible Reflections is a series of windows to be opened daily providing ‘light to our paths’ (Psalm 119:105).

The variety of readings and contributors are structured around celebrating the transformative power of scripture and ‘BRF’s long history of coming alongside people at all stages of faith, encouraging Bible reading and everyday faith since 1922’. A third of the commentaries are constituted from daily readings journeying through Old and New Testament without Apocrypha. Another third journeys through the Christian year from Advent to Pentecost. Shorter sections include praying the Psalms, the Bible and old age and a final section linked to the marks of mission adopted by the Anglican Communion: tell, teach, tend, transform and treasure.

The theme of ‘Sharing the Story’ runs through the collection of one page reflections which end appropriately with the invitation in Romans to listen more deeply to the longings of creation and deepen environmental stewardship. The book is well geared for flexible use as, for examples, deciding to use it in a season like Lent or to follow a three month tour through Old and New Testament or spend a fortnight on what the Bible has to say to older people. Each day has different scripture and contributor and that makes for ongoing freshness.

There is no word of God without power. In this book BRF provides a variety of insight from hundreds of co-authors into the transforming power of the good news of Jesus Christ.

Reviewed by Canon Dr John Twisleton 

 

Reviewed by Richard Frost

It was George Eliot who coined the phrase: ‘Don’t judge a book by its cover.’

Well, when it comes to The BRF Book of 365 Bible Reflections the cover is the starting point to a beautiful collection of daily readings to celebrate an organisation which has been sharing the story since 1922.

BRF reaches in to many different places in our communities and churches. From Messy Church and Parenting for Faith through to Holy Habits and Anna Chaplaincy. And still, one hundred years on, at the core of its overall ministry, alongside many other books, remains the provision of daily readings and reflections. And this book is no exception.

Gathering together contributions from BRF authors, supporters and well-wishers, we are taken through the Bible and the Christian year, enabled to consider five aspects of how we can live and to cross generational barriers.

But this is no ordinary set of daily readings. And that is its genius.

For it is only in Advent where the readings are dated. Lent is split in to weeks but aside from that, those seasonal times are there for you as a reader to make your own way of encountering God through scripture. The rest of the book is completely undated: and that for me, although the editors describe it as ‘controversial’, is where that genius lies. For so many of us feel guilty when we ‘fall behind’ with our daily readings. Many of us may feel that in particular periods we want to move on to a different topic or set of passages but somehow feel tied to following the timetable.

And there is one other aspect which is equally brilliant. Some of the contributors are well-known. Others, like your reviewer, less well. Some are living. Some are living in glory. And they are all listed. But there’s no index. So, it’s not possible to simply look up one’s favourites writers and read only them. And why is that genius? Because it enables us to give intentional attention to God and not to people.

It is those two factors, alongside an indexed list of Bible passages, which for me give this book the structure that enables us to encounter God in new ways every day of the year.

Through its meaningful and thoughtful reflections, this book enables the reader to encounter the riches of the Bible in the complete freedom that God both allows and wants for us. It provides a wealth of biblical insights combined with practical reflections and suggestions for living out our faith in modern times. May it be a rich blessing to you as you encounter God’s love through it.

Richard Frost is the author of Life with St Benedict and writes a blog at workrestpray.com

Details
  • Product code: 9781800391000
  • Published: 22 October 2021
  • Format: Jacketed hardback
  • Pages: 416
  • Dimensions: 153mm wide and 234mm high
The Bible is at the heart of BRF’s work, and this special anniversary collection is a celebration of the Bible for BRF’s centenary year.

Bringing together a fantastically wide-ranging writing team of authors, supporters and well-wishers from all areas of BRF’s work, this resource is designed to help us go deeper into the story of the Bible and reflect on how we can share it in our everyday lives.

Including sections which lead us through the Bible narrative as well as thematic and seasonal sections, it is the perfect daily companion to resource your spiritual journey.

 

Contributors include: Ian Adams, John Bell, Inderjit Bhogal, Amy Boucher Pye, Stephen Cottrell, Steven Croft, Mark Greene, Isabelle Hamley, Bob Hartman, Bev Jullien, Krish Kandiah, Paul Kerensa, Ann Lewin, Bex Lewis, Chine McDonald, Lucy Moore, Rob Parsons, John Pritchard, Jennifer Rees Larcombe, Pam Rhodes, Margaret Silf, Jo Swinney, Stephen Timms, Graham Tomlin and Justin Welby.

 

Reviews

Transforming Ministry (digital version May 2022). Reviewed by David Sellick

The year 2022 celebrates the  centenary of BRF’s  famous notes encouraging Bible reading and supporting faith.   The 365 reflections are grouped into  five sections; Seeing God in the Bible, Journeying through the Bible,  Journeying through the Christian year, Together through the generations, and How should we live?  Only the ‘Christian Year’ section is chronologically tied; the other sections can be dipped into individually;  this is facilitated by a page ‘Index of Bible references’ at the end of the book;  Readers could use this to take them to a page where the Bible passage  that  had stimulated the writer’s ‘reflection’ is printed matches the passage that is part of a reading set for the day on which the  Reader is due to preach. 

The editors selected single ‘reflections’ from the invited writers – many of great eminence –  so ‘the result is a glorious  range of different perspectives on God’s word’. The Bible extracts are from every book in the Bible, and come from 17 different Bible translations.  Some reflections are personal, some are moving, many are challenging and thought provoking; the compilation can be used as a resource or simply read as an illustration of how just a couple of Bible verses can stimulate such a wide range profound insights into faith and practice.
Reviewed by David Sellick 


Reviewed by Canon John Twisleton, December 2021

A hundred years ago in January 2022 Revd Leslie Mannering of St Matthew’s Brixton circulated his first monthly leaflet of bible readings with commentaries ‘for the purpose of deepening the life of Prayer, Bible-reading and Holy Communion in each one of us’. So began what became the world-wide movement we know as BRF, the Bible Reading Fellowship.

The Centenary is being launched with publication of 365 bible reflections written by different contributors, including myself, geared to energise searching of scripture and submission of lives to the Word of God. As Sally Welch writes, ‘we are not a people of a book… we are children of God… we follow a person, not a page; the Word, not words’.

The genius of BRF is its steering away from both biblical literalism and renegotiation of scripture to fit in with contemporary thinking. The BRF book of 365 Bible Reflections is a series of windows to be opened daily providing ‘light to our paths’ (Psalm 119:105).

The variety of readings and contributors are structured around celebrating the transformative power of scripture and ‘BRF’s long history of coming alongside people at all stages of faith, encouraging Bible reading and everyday faith since 1922’. A third of the commentaries are constituted from daily readings journeying through Old and New Testament without Apocrypha. Another third journeys through the Christian year from Advent to Pentecost. Shorter sections include praying the Psalms, the Bible and old age and a final section linked to the marks of mission adopted by the Anglican Communion: tell, teach, tend, transform and treasure.

The theme of ‘Sharing the Story’ runs through the collection of one page reflections which end appropriately with the invitation in Romans to listen more deeply to the longings of creation and deepen environmental stewardship. The book is well geared for flexible use as, for examples, deciding to use it in a season like Lent or to follow a three month tour through Old and New Testament or spend a fortnight on what the Bible has to say to older people. Each day has different scripture and contributor and that makes for ongoing freshness.

There is no word of God without power. In this book BRF provides a variety of insight from hundreds of co-authors into the transforming power of the good news of Jesus Christ.

Reviewed by Canon Dr John Twisleton 

 

Reviewed by Richard Frost

It was George Eliot who coined the phrase: ‘Don’t judge a book by its cover.’

Well, when it comes to The BRF Book of 365 Bible Reflections the cover is the starting point to a beautiful collection of daily readings to celebrate an organisation which has been sharing the story since 1922.

BRF reaches in to many different places in our communities and churches. From Messy Church and Parenting for Faith through to Holy Habits and Anna Chaplaincy. And still, one hundred years on, at the core of its overall ministry, alongside many other books, remains the provision of daily readings and reflections. And this book is no exception.

Gathering together contributions from BRF authors, supporters and well-wishers, we are taken through the Bible and the Christian year, enabled to consider five aspects of how we can live and to cross generational barriers.

But this is no ordinary set of daily readings. And that is its genius.

For it is only in Advent where the readings are dated. Lent is split in to weeks but aside from that, those seasonal times are there for you as a reader to make your own way of encountering God through scripture. The rest of the book is completely undated: and that for me, although the editors describe it as ‘controversial’, is where that genius lies. For so many of us feel guilty when we ‘fall behind’ with our daily readings. Many of us may feel that in particular periods we want to move on to a different topic or set of passages but somehow feel tied to following the timetable.

And there is one other aspect which is equally brilliant. Some of the contributors are well-known. Others, like your reviewer, less well. Some are living. Some are living in glory. And they are all listed. But there’s no index. So, it’s not possible to simply look up one’s favourites writers and read only them. And why is that genius? Because it enables us to give intentional attention to God and not to people.

It is those two factors, alongside an indexed list of Bible passages, which for me give this book the structure that enables us to encounter God in new ways every day of the year.

Through its meaningful and thoughtful reflections, this book enables the reader to encounter the riches of the Bible in the complete freedom that God both allows and wants for us. It provides a wealth of biblical insights combined with practical reflections and suggestions for living out our faith in modern times. May it be a rich blessing to you as you encounter God’s love through it.

Richard Frost is the author of Life with St Benedict and writes a blog at workrestpray.com