How to Be a Church Minister

How to Be a Church Minister

Author : Nigel G. Wright
£10.99

This timely book sets out what is involved in being a Christian minister - its joys and challenges, its responsibilities and privileges. It discusses the call to and the work of ministry; the breadth and nature of the task. It will enable you to understand your calling more fully and inform your practice. It will stimulate careful and biblical reflection. How to be a Church Minister is relevant across a wide spectrum of church traditions, both to those already in ministry and to those contemplating the vocation. It is set to be a seminal volume on the subject.


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Title How to Be a Church Minister
Author Nigel G. Wright
Description

This timely book sets out what is involved in being a Christian minister - its joys and challenges, its responsibilities and privileges. It discusses the call to and the work of ministry; the breadth and nature of the task. It will enable you to understand your calling more fully and inform your practice. It will stimulate careful and biblical reflection. How to be a Church Minister is relevant across a wide spectrum of church traditions, both to those already in ministry and to those contemplating the vocation. It is set to be a seminal volume on the subject.

Details
  • Product code: 9780857466891
  • Published: 20 April 2018
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 208
  • Dimensions: 130mm wide and 198mm high

This timely book sets out what is involved in being a Christian minister - its joys and challenges, its responsibilities and privileges. It discusses the call to and the work of ministry; the breadth and nature of the task. It will enable you to understand your calling more fully and inform your practice. It will stimulate careful and biblical reflection. How to be a Church Minister is relevant across a wide spectrum of church traditions, both to those already in ministry and to those contemplating the vocation. It is set to be a seminal volume on the subject.

  • Introduction: viewing the territory
  • Be clear about God's call
  • Lay firm theological foundations
  • Appreciate the need for recognition
  • Bear the word of God
  • Construct a supportive base for ministry
  • Build the congregation
  • Pastor the people
  • Conduct worship well
  • Have the courage to lead
  • Seek the lost, heal the sick, overcome evil
  • Value the occasional offices
  • Stay on the boil
  • Commit to lifelong development
  • Endure and prevail
  • Epilogue: ending well

This latest book from Nigel Wright should be on the reading list of all ordinands and ministers. It will be of no surprise to those who read Nigel's books that it is insightful, encouraging and stimulating. To those considering ministry it will be useful in preparing and discerning the way forward. And for those of us already in ministry it challenges and reminds us of our professional calling and how we can best serve the people God calls us to.
Revd (Capt) C J Rogers, Royal Army Chaplains' Department

Preach, Autumn 2018. Review by Richard Littledale

To me, Nigel Wright is a spiritual grandee -- a man whose spiritual stature, intellectual understanding and wit I have admired since the day I first met him when I was a nervous prospective ministry candidate. In this regard, the book does not disappoint. It reads like the mature reflection of a finely-tuned theological mind laced with enough wit and humility to gain the reader's interest.

Nigel states that he book is intended for four different audiences. These are: those exploring a call to ministry, those training for such a call, those exercising church ministry and those retiring from it. Although this is a wide brief, it fulfils it well. Where the book is less successful, I feel, is the attempt to 'translate' the insights for those of all different church traditions. Nigel is a Baptist -- and his most profound insights are drawn from that tradition.

Those Baptist-honed insights, though, are worth their weight in gold. Nigel is a past master of pithy theological insight and he does not disappoint here. Consider this description, for instance, of the call to preach: 'the task of ministry is to render God's word'. Only a minister and theologian of Nigel's standing could write the following description of ministry: 'The long obedience means holding to Jesus Christ without diminution, addition or compromise.' If I could sum the book up, it would be that it is an extended defence of and call for integrity in every aspect of ministry. After serving as a Baptist minister for over 30 years, I found much in these pages to make me think, reflect and pray.

As well as dealing with aspects of call and training, Nigel also writes about the many and varied facets of church ministry -- from weekly services and pastoral visiting, to occasional offices, conflict resolution and continuing ministerial development. The book is unique amongst those I have ever read on ministry in that it also talks about how, and whether, to bring a ministry to an end. This truly is a comprehensive account.

I cannot think of any stage of ministry at which I would not recommend this book. I have just completed it as an experienced minister, and I am about to lend it to a young man who is contemplating the first inklings of a call to church ministry. I leave you with one of Nigel's typically rich, but elegant, descriptions of what ministry is all about:

'A habitual disposition of prayerful availability to God through Jesus Christ and in the Spirit.'

If you seek such a disposition, have lost it, or even need to lay it down -- I commend this book to you.

Review by Richard Littledale

 

The Reader, Summer 2019. Review by David Hanson

Yet another sober, balanced and thoughtful account of the minister’s craft and calling? Who needs it, I wonder, when there are so many? A glance at the chapter headings – build the congregations; pastor the people; conduct worship well – tells us what is in store. That said, Wright covers the ground well. His writing is clear, practical and wise. There is good biblical reference, honest personal reflection, and a strong sense that ministry may be energising and fresh. A chapter headed ‘stay on the boil’ draws from Richard Baxter and is excellent. ‘When our hears grow cold, our preaching grows cold… If we forbear to take food, then others will be famished,’ he writes – not to discourage, but to urge readers to carry on finding ways to ‘nurture every aspect of our service.’ I was glad to have read this.

Reviewed by David Hanson

Nigel G. Wright is Principal Emeritus of Spurgeon's College, where he taught theology from 1987 to 1995 and was Principal from 2000 to 2013. He is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and the Royal Historical Society. He is a prolific author and is widely engaged in preaching and teaching nationally and internationally.