Holy Habits: Worship: Missional discipleship resources for churches

Holy Habits: Worship: Missional discipleship resources for churches

Authors : Andrew Roberts , Neil Johnson and Tom Milton
£4.99

Worship can arise from a glad heart, but it can also be the deliberate choice of a hurting one. All of life can be worship when lived for love of God. Learning to make everything we do in our daily lives a worship offering to God is about 24/7 life, everyday discipleship

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Title Holy Habits: Worship: Missional discipleship resources for churches
Authors Andrew Roberts , Neil Johnson and Tom Milton
Description

Worship can arise from a glad heart, but it can also be the deliberate choice of a hurting one. All of life can be worship when lived for love of God. Learning to make everything we do in our daily lives a worship offering to God is about 24/7 life, everyday discipleship

Holy Habits is an adventure in Christian discipleship. Inspired by Luke’s model of church found in Acts 2:42–47, it identifies ten habits and encourages the development of a way of life formed by them.
The habits are: Biblical Teaching, Fellowship, Breaking Bread, Prayer, Sharing Resources, Serving, Eating Together, Gladness and Generosity, Worship, and Making More Disciples.
These resources are designed to help churches explore the habits creatively in a range of contexts and live them out in whole-life, intergenerational, missional discipleship.

Details
  • Product code: 9780857466860
  • Published: 19 January 2018
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 64
  • Dimensions: 148mm wide and 210mm high

Worship can arise from a glad heart, but it can also be the deliberate choice of a hurting one. All of life can be worship when lived for love of God. Learning to make everything we do in our daily lives a worship offering to God is about 24/7 life, everyday discipleship

Holy Habits is an adventure in Christian discipleship. Inspired by Luke’s model of church found in Acts 2:42–47, it identifies ten habits and encourages the development of a way of life formed by them.
The habits are: Biblical Teaching, Fellowship, Breaking Bread, Prayer, Sharing Resources, Serving, Eating Together, Gladness and Generosity, Worship, and Making More Disciples.
These resources are designed to help churches explore the habits creatively in a range of contexts and live them out in whole-life, intergenerational, missional discipleship.

Neil Johnson is Co-Superintendent Minister of the Birmingham Methodist Circuit. Tom Milton is Communications Officer for the Birmingham Methodist Circuit. Andrew Roberts is a Methodist minister working as Discipleship Specialist within the Discipleship and Ministries Learning Network, and author of the book Holy Habits (Malcolm Down Publishing, 2016). He previously served as Director of Training with Fresh Expressions and co-authored Fresh! An introduction to fresh expressions and pioneer ministry (SCM Press, 2012).

Premier Christianity Magazine, August 2018. Review by Justin Brierley ****

Methodist minister Andrew Roberts has achieved an ambitious task. He and a team of editors have delivered a set of ten Holy Habits booklets that will enable an entire church community to explore a multifaceted approach to discipleship.

The series covers ten elements of discipleship distilled from the life of the early Church as describefd in Acts 2:42-47: Biblical Teaching, Fellowship, Breaking Bread, Prayer, Sharing Resources, Serving, Eating Together, Gladness and Generosity, Worship and Making More Disciples.

There is much to commend in the Holy Habits initiative. Each booklet offers a range of suggestions for incorporating and exploring each respective habit. This includes worship ideas, preaching notes, small group activities, creative projects and individual and community practices.

The books will act as a starting point for churches planning a long-term discipleship programme, but leaders will need to put in effort themselves to flesh out some of the ideas contained within.

Review by Justin Brierley