Praying the Way: with Matthew, Mark, Luke and John

Praying the Way: with Matthew, Mark, Luke and John

Author : Terry Hinks
£10.99

Learn to experience God's presence through prayer

Through raw and authentic prayers, based on the gospel stories, Terry Hinks leads readers into the heart of the gospels the more clearly to see the needs and joys of today's world. This highly original book helps readers to pray out of, and with, the words of Jesus and to discover the joy of prayer as a two-way conversation - listening as much as speaking to God.


Also available on Kindle

Buy on Kindle
Title Praying the Way: with Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
Author Terry Hinks
Description

Through raw and authentic prayers, based on the gospel stories, Terry Hinks leads readers into the heart of the gospels the more clearly to see the needs and joys of today's world. This highly original book helps readers to pray out of, and with, the words of Jesus and to discover the joy of prayer as a two-way conversation - listening as much as speaking to God.

Details
  • Product code: 9780857467164
  • Published: 19 October 2018
  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 208
  • Dimensions: 130mm wide and 198mm high

Through raw and authentic prayers, based on the gospel stories, Terry Hinks leads readers into the heart of the gospels the more clearly to see the needs and joys of today's world. This highly original book helps readers to pray out of, and with, the words of Jesus and to discover the joy of prayer as a two-way conversation - listening as much as speaking to God.

Terry Hinks' book is a multi-layered gift. At once, it both offers prayers that can enrich personal devotions and public worship and enables insightfully novel theological reflection upon some very familiar material. I am grateful for it myself and warmly commend it.
Revd Nigel Uden, URC General Assembly Moderator 2018 - 2020

Terry Hinks is a gifted wordsmith. His latest book, Praying the Way with Matthew, Mark, Luke and John consists of 160 amazingly fresh prayers - 40 for each gospel - in which Scripture becomes the springboard for the soul. I know of no other prayer resource quite like it. I found these prayers not just stimulating and broadening, but also deeply challenging. This is a book not to be read - but to be used. I warmly commend it to anyone looking for a more authentic relationship with God.
Paul Beasley-Murray, 'Church Matters'

Terry Hinks has thought and written over many years about ways that the gospels can inspire and inform our praying. Now this mature collection of prayers draws on important texts from across the four gospels and from all around the themes of the Christian year. The primary tone is reflective, coming near to God in measured, thoughtful praise, and with deep confidence and hope. The language is both reverent and accessible, moving yet not complicated. These prayers would work very well in a church service, and would be equally helpful in a small house group or in private devotion. This book deserves to circulate widely, and I suspect that many copies will become well-worn in the course of the years. This is a resource to return to, time and again, for one's own faith and in the service of others.
The Revd John Proctor, General Secretary, The United Reformed Church

Terry Hinks' thoughtful and useful prayers help us better understand the Jesus presented in each of the gospels. The book is very helpful for personal devotional use, but also an invaluable resource for leaders of worship.
Andy Braunston, Coordinator of URC Daily Devotion Project

Terry writes with freshness and honesty to all those who, like him, are trying to walk Christ's way. Like a seasoned traveller, he crafts prayers - inspired by the four gospels - that act as a way marker for his fellow travellers. I warmly commend this resource to enable us all to pray the way before turning back to the challenges that await us on the road.
Revd Richard Church, Deputy General Secretary (Discipleship) of The United Reformed Church

In Praying the Way, Terry Hinks has developed his work around the four gospels into a thoughtful and accessible resource for prayer. He takes Jesus' life and relationship with his heavenly Father as a starting point for exploring our own life of prayer. This book, while primarily designed as an aid to personal devotion, will, I am sure, be a source of material for many worship leaders.
Revd Clare Downing, Moderator of the Wessex Synod

Terry Hinks is a United Reformed Church minister, serving churches in Hereford, Reading and Romsey before moving to two churches in the High Wycombe area. He served as Secretary to the URC Doctrine Prayer and Worship Committee and contributed the Order of Daily Worship to the URC's Service Book Worship. He is the author of a number of books on prayer.

The Reader website, 6 March 2019. Review by Laura Hillman.

This collection of prayers and meditations is firmly anchored in the four gospels. An introduction to each section highlights the characteristics of prayer in Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. The reader is invited to follow 'the way', a life based on prayer leading to action and changed attitudes. The author has obviously thought hard and long about the lessons to be learned and the strength to be gained from meditating on the scriptures. Each prayer is introduced by a sentence from the relevant gospel with a reference to the longer passage from which it is drawn. The language is refreshingly simple and direct with sparing and effective use of imagery. Although rooted in the Bible, the text has multiple references to life in the 21st century. As well as being a springboard for personal prayer these readings will provide new insights for preachers and study group leaders looking for a fresh take on a well-known text.

Review by Laura Hillman

www.readers.cofe.anglican.org/resources

_______________________________________________

Reform Magazine, Dec 2018-Jan2019, reviewed by John Proctor

Terry Hinks has thought and written over many years about ways in which the gospels can inspire and shape our praying. His long ministry, across four United Reformed Church pastorates, has certainly deepened and developed this work, and now he has provided us with a rich collection of mature prayers, drawing on important texts from across the four gospels and around the themes of the Christian year.

Praying the Way contains 160 prayers in all - 40 based on passages in each of the gospels. Most of them are short - between about 100 and 150 words in length - and, while Hinks has a recognisable mood and approach, there is definitely no single pattern of length, rhythm or style. The primary tone is reflective, drawing near to God in measured, thoughtful praise, with deep confidence and hope, yet often with searching humility too. The language is both reverent and accessible, often moving, never complex.

The prayers in Praying the Way would work well in church worship and could be equally helpful in a house group or for private use. They would connect most deeply with Christians who were reasonably familiar with the bibilcal material, and who were glad to have their thoughts taken to new places in their praying. Worship leaders will welcome the book, not least because the prayers relate so directly and obviously to scripture passages, many of which appear in the Revised Common Lectionary used in Sunday services.

A few sample snippets from the book with show the counterpoint of freshness and familiarity. The prayer based on Matthew 18:12-13 talks of 'sheep, ready to be counted, not to send us to sleep, but to waken us to your kingdom'. The one on Mark 2:1-12 says: 'Let us praise God for friends who carry us through the darkest of times'. The prayer for Luke 15:8-10 asks: 'Holy Spirit, sweep through the dust of my life'.

This book deserves to be widely known and well used, and many copies will surely become well-worn in the course of the years. This is a resource to return to, time and again, for one's own faith and in the service of others.

John Proctor is General Secretary of the United Reformed Church


 This is a real treasure trove. Here are 40 readings and prayers for each of the 4 Gospels; 160 pages of wisdom, illumination, inspiration and motivation with helpful introductions and an Appendix suggesting ways in which these jewels can be made to sparkle. What is found here is not just the product of academic study but of rich pastoral experience in grass-roots ministry serving churches in Hereford, Reading, Romsey and High Wycombe.

The value of these crisp reflections is that they can be used systematically to travel through the Gospels or they can be dipped into. They are also a valuable starting point for sermon preparation because of their pithy headings and the prayers which give further insight.

I warmly commend this creative devotional book.

Revd Tom Stuckey, a Former President of the Methodist Church in Britain


The Baptist Times, 16.01.19. Reviewed by Keith Parr

I found myself in a rather beautiful place in late October.

There is this beautiful little Baptist church in beautiful Bunessan on the beautiful Isle of Mull in beautiful Scotland. Everything about it is, well beautiful! The people smile an outrageous amount, the weather is always clement (unless it's cold and raining which happens quite a lot) and the view from the pulpit... oh my, I could wax lyrical about the view from the pulpit for hours.

I found myself in this beautiful place clutching this book I'd promised to review. I don't normally use much liturgy or many written prayers when I lead worship, but decided to take Praying the Way for a trial run this Sunday morning, knowing after the service I could ask all of the congregation if it helped or hindered their encounter with Jesus.

This is how it works: Terry Hinks has written prayers around various passages in the four Gospels. As I was preaching on John 4:1-42 (Jesus and the woman at the well) after the reading, I used the prayer based on that passage. Leading the prayer felt a little odd, but that could be put down to my lack of practice with this form of praying. The congregation, though, all seemed to appreciate the structure and pauses (which I put in), especially because it related to the reading and the sermon.

I probably wouldn't have purchased this, but it is the kind of book that I will know I can dip into if needs be. If your church uses liturgical language you will like this a lot. If you don't, then it isn't a bad idea to have these resources around, and this is not a bad place to start.

Review by Keith Parr, the minister at Maghull Baptist Church north of Liverpool